Estonia's Health Care Spending Lowest in OECD ({{commentsTotal}})

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Freshly released 2011 figures from OECD reveal that Estonia spends the smallest percentage of its GDP on health care of any of the organization's member states.

Estonia spent 5.9 percent of its total GDP on health services and products, far lower than the average of 9.3 percent in the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, according to information from the organization's  press release on Friday.

The percentage of GDP devoted to health care fell on average in the OECD from 9.5 percent in 2010, while in Estonia, spending grew by 1.2 percent, following a 6.9 percent decrease the previous year.

Per capital spending in 2011 was 1,000 euros, a long way to go to the organization's average of over 2,500 euros.

Besides Estonia, Poland (6.3 percent of GDP is spent on health care), South Korea (7.4 percent) and the Czech Republic (7.5 percent) are at the bottom of the list. No fresh data is available for Turkey or Mexico, which are thought to also be near Estonia.

The United States (17.7 percent), the Netherlands (11.9 percent) and France (11.6 percent) are the top three.

The health care expenditure report takes into account public health spending, prevention costs, private costs, including medicine.



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