Election Spending Forecasts: IRL to Spend Big ({{commentsTotal}})

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The four largest parties disclosed initial election campaign spending estimates, with IRL set to outspend others.

Speaking on Wednesday evening's television program “Foorum,” IRL's Secretary General Tiit Riisalo said they have a budget of up to one million euros, but a large slice of that has already been spent on a recent nationwide poll.

“2012 was one of those rare years we managed to pay off all debt and even set a little aside,” said Indrek Saar, head of the Social Democratic Parliamentary faction, adding that they will spend 500,000 euros on this year's local elections.

The Center Party's Secretary General Priit Toobal said it is hard to forecast campaign expenditure as the main parties are running in 100 or more municipalities and all those branches of the party contribute differently.

Toobal said his party is likely to spend between 500,000 and 700,000 euros.

Toobal's counterpart at the Reform Party, Martin Kukk, did not disclose a figure, saying the final sum will probably be slightly higher than for the previous local elections in 2009.

Four years ago, during the previous local elections, the Reform Party and the Center Party topped the list, spending around 820,000 and 770,000 euros respectively.

IRL spent just over 500,000 euros; the Social Democrats, 200,000 euros.



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