Georgian-Estonian Movie 'Tangerines' Reaches Cinemas ({{commentsTotal}})

Culture
Culture

The Estonian-Georgian produced feature film "Tangerines" premiered yesterday at the Amirani cinema in Tbilisi.

Commenting on bilateral collaboration, Estonian ambassador to Georgia Priit Turk told ETV: "The cultural cooperation program effective till 2016 that was signed by the two countries' ministries of culture in the summer has created a good foundation for future activity."

"Tangerines," which premiers in Estonia on October 31, tells the story of the Abkhazian war of 1992. Two wounded soldiers from opposite sides seek refuge in an Estonian village in Abkhazia, abandoned except for two old men who have stayed to look after their tangerine orchards.

One of the old men, played by Lembit Ulfsak, seeks an answer to the question whether anyone at all is profiting from the war, all the while trying to pacify two very emotional soldiers.

Besides the seasoned Estonian actor Lembit Ulfsak, the film stars Elmo Nüganen, Mikhail Meskhi, Giorgi Nakashidze and Raivo Trass.

The co-production is directed by Zaza Urushdadze and shooting took place in late 2012 and early 2013.

It was produced by Estonia’s Allfilm and Cinema24 of Georgia. The trailer, with English subtitles, is below.

 

 



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