Telliskivi Provides Snapshot of Estonian Photography ({{commentsTotal}})

Culture
Culture

The Telliskivi Creative Center is hosting a three-day photo exhibition, displaying work by dozens of Estonian photographers.

Among other free public workshops and lectures at the event, curator Mikiko Kikuta will discuss contemporary Japanese photography and its stark differences with European styles, reported ETV. The event is part of Tallinn Photography Month.

Another international guest is American curator Sam Barzilay, an organizer of the New York Photo Festival.

“[Estonian photography] goes beyond documentary. It brings in a certain level of conceptual thought. It asks the viewer to really interact with the work, to think about the work; not just look at it, appreciate it aesthetically,” Barzilay said.

Barzilay was also a member of the jury of the ArtProof stipend contest held in Estonia, this year won by Maxim Mjödov's project "Russian album."

“There's a certain voice that's very Estonian that I've seen in the last few years and I felt that in this situation the same thing applied. It was both a very Estonian voice but also a very universal voice at the same time,” Barzilay said.

Mjödov won an opportunity to attend the New York Photo Festival and a 5,000-euro stipend for holding exhibitions at Estonian galleries.



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