This Week's (And a Little of Last Year's) Weather ({{commentsTotal}})


Classic winter conditions returned over the weekend to make the capital area seem lighter and brighter, but conditions are not yet ideal for many.

That includes cross-country skiers (Tartu has only 3 cm of very unsubstantial base with about month to go before the marathon) to farmers (winter rapeseed may be damaged without enough of an insulating layer).

While conditions in Tallinn have resembled a snow globe over the last 36 hours, only 6 cm had fallen as of this morning. Interestingly, an area of the north coast corresponding almost exactly with the boundaries of Lahemaa National Park has received a foot of snow.

More of the same light and fluffy snow is expected this week, as a high-pressure system continues to consolidate over all of northern Europe. Temperatures will drop a few degrees as the week progresses. In general, daytime highs will be -4 to -9 C while nights should see -9 to -13 C. Winds will be light, first from the north, then east in the tail end of the week.

According to some long-range forecasts, the current cold spell could last through January 25.

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The Meteorology and Hydrology Institute has released its recap of 2013, which was notable for its warm spring, summer and autumn.

Highlights and facts:

- May was the second-warmest in the last 50 years (17.0 average temperature). Only May 1993 was warmer (17.6). The average temperature in May broke many local records.

- The summer was also a good one - that is, for fans of summer, not those worrying about climate change. The 17.4 C average was tied with 1999 for second. The record is shared by 2010 and 2011 (18.1 C). The summer also received only 71 percent of long-term average rainfall.

- The highest temperature was 32.5 C on August 8 in Valga, the lowest was -28.7 C on January 19 in Jõgeva, an inland town called the capital of cold weather.

- The highest wind speed was 119.5 kph on Vilsandi, an island off Saaremaa.

- The year had a snowy start, March was the coldest month, and the last of the snow didn't melt until April 20. But despite sleet in late September, the year ended with a December that was tied for second-warmest of the last 50 years, not that it felt "warm" at all.

- Viljandi had 99 days on which the sun did not show itself at all, qualifying it for the cloudiest town.