Tallinn Music Week Announces Festival Program ({{commentsTotal}})

Culture
Culture

The last weekend of March will see the capital taken over by the Tallinn Music Week (TMW), which will showcase 227 artists from 20 countries.

This year, TMW will feature 78 foreign artists: 19 from Finland, 12 from Latvia, 12 from Lithuania, seven from Russia, four from Denmark and three each from Belarus, the United Kingdom and Iceland, the organizers announced in a press release that includes the full list of performers.

Some of the highlights are the British retro-futurist duo Public Service Broadcasting, BRNS from Belgium, 80s synth group Ballet School from Germany and the Russian post-rock trio Everything is Made in China.

The festival, in its sixth year, has become a staple in the schedule of the region's music industry, attracting artists and professionals from neighboring countries and beyond.

The festival program includes Estonian artists currently making waves as well as up-and-coming foreign artists, the head of the festival program, Kristo Rajasaare said.

TMW’s City Stage, which offers free-of-charge daytime concerts in various public venues, will publish its schedule on 17 February.

Last year, Tallinn Music Week was attended by 17,000 people.



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