Estonian Air to Operate Netherlands-Sweden Route ({{commentsTotal}})

Bombardier CRJ900 NextGen Source: Photo: Postimees/Scanpix
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Estonian national airline Estonian Air has signed a commercial agreement starting in May with Växjö Smaland Airport in Sweden to serve an air route to Amsterdam.

According to Estonian Air's press release on Tuesday, the airline will have eight flights a week starting on May 4. Estonian Air will use a 76-seater Embraer 170. The agreement will be good for one year.

"The agreement gives Estonian Air a very good possibility to utilize one of its two surplus aircraft capacity with low risk, and it is of course convenient to operate to Amsterdam since we do operate the same destination from Tallinn," said Jan Palmer, the CEO of Estonian Air.

The Estonian Air fleet has seven aircraft, four Embraer 170 and three Bombardier CRJ900 NextGen. The airline serves Stockholm, Copenhagen, Amsterdam, Brussels, Oslo, Moscow, Munich, St. Petersburg, Kiev, Vilnius, and Trondheim with five aircraft. One aircraft is based in Birmingham for charter and another contracts on the European market with Air Charter Service (ACS) in London.

Växjö is located 450 kilometers southwest of Stockholm, and 135 kilometers south by southeast of Jönköping.

 



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