Foreign Tourist Numbers See Moderate Growth ({{commentsTotal}})

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The number of foreign visitors to Estonia jumped 11 percent in January compared to the same period last year, mostly due to visitors from Russia and Finland, Statistics Estonia reported on Wednesday.

 

The rise in tourists was measured from January of this year to January of 2013 and gauged by booking patterns at Estonian accommodation establishments. Compared to January 2013, Russian visitors rose by 15 percent, and Finns by 13 percent.

Those two groups were also the largest groups visiting Estonia during the 12-month span. Around 47,000 tourists came from Russia and 34,000 from Finland, which made up three-quarters of tourists who stayed in accommodations in the country.

The number of Asian tourists also increased by 62 percent, but still made up only a fraction of the total visitors. Estonia saw a smaller number of tourists from other EU countries year-on-year.

In January, 62,000 domestic travelers stayed in accommodation establishments, which was 2 percent less than in January 2013. Domestic tourists made up 57 percent of that number, while 28 percent were on a business trip.

In January, 849 accommodation establishments offered services  - 18,000 rooms and 40,000 beds. The room occupancy rate that month was 33 percent, and the bed occupancy 28 percent.

The average cost of a night's stay per person in January was 34 euros, one euro more than in January 2013. In Harju County, the average cost of a night was 39 euros, while it was only 23 euros in Pärnu County and 25 euros in Tartu County.



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