Statistics Estonia: Gender Wage Gap Rose in 2013 ({{commentsTotal}})

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Estonia's gender wage gap, already the biggest in the EU, continued to widen slightly in 2013, with men making an average of 24.8 percent more money than women across all sectors. 

The gap was 0.2 percentage points larger than it was 12 months before that, in October 2012. The European Commission has put the figure in recent years as high as 30 percent, while the average difference in salaries in the EU, while still in favor of males, is under 20 percent. 

Gross hourly wage for women in Estonia (figures do not include bonuses) was 4.58 euros while men made 6.09 euros.

The hourly wage increased 7.2 percent for men but only 7.0 percent for women. This was the main contributing factor to the wider gap.

The gap was at its highest ever in 1994, when it was 28.9 percent, Statistics Estonia said.

An area in which there was practically no gap was transport and storage; in fact women made 0.2 percent more than male wage-earners (who made up 71 percent of workforce in this sector).

The gap was biggest in financial services and insurance (41.8 percent). Men account for 28 percent of the workforce in this sector.

Compared to 2012, the gap increased the most (15 percentage points) in "other services" while it decreased the most (7.8 percentage points) in art, entertainment and leisure activities sector.



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