Tallinn’s Street Food Festival Attracts Thousands ({{commentsTotal}})

Culture
Culture

Thousands of noshers showed up for a culinary celebration in the trendy Telliskivi Loomelinnak outside the Old Town over the weekend and helped pick the delicacies that will represent Estonia at Expo 2015 in Milan.

The festival was touted as the first street food festival in the Baltic states and aimed to dispel the idea that street food consists of dry hamburgers, Elena Natale, the organizer of the street food competition, told ETV today.

The turnout surpassed the organizers’ wildest dreams - instead of the expected 4,000 visitors, around 10,000 people descended on the Telliskivi creative area on Sunday.

In addition to examples of the cuisine of various countries, the festival also held a vote on the dish that would be included in the Estonian exhibition at the Expo 2015.

A total 64 recipes were submitted to the competition and 600 portions were prepared for the festival. The 417 people voted in the final where five dishes competed, including fish, meat and desserts.

Toivo Kratt’s rye bread with sprats and quail egg was voted as the winner who will go on to compete in the World's Fair competition in Milan. Member of the judging panel Indrek Kivisalu told ETV's morning program that the treat could go down well as a calling card in Italy. 



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