Veterinary Board Casts About for Outlet for Estonian Dairy Products ({{commentsTotal}})

A milk packaging line at Laeva Dairy in Tartu County Source: Photo: Postimees/Scanpix
Business
Business

Russian-bound food turned back at the border can be sold in Estonia if special permission has been granted by the Veterinary and Food Board and the sale outlet is furnished with Estonian-language information, the agency's director said. To this point no company has pursued this option.

"It is allowed in exceptional cases to market food packaged for the Russian market in Estonia, if a company needs to do so," said Ago Pärtel, the director general of the Veterinary and Food Board, on ERR radio.

Meanwhile, Pärtel said, the agency has been sending out letters to far-flung markets to inquire about import requirements for milk products. The countries included Indonesia, Taiwan, Kenya and Tanzania.

Russian Prime Minister Dmitri Medvedev announced on August 7 that Russia would slap a one-year ban on all EU, US, Australian, Canadian and Norwegian meat, dairy and produce. In particular, the Estonian dairy and fishery sector could be heavily impacted.



{{c.alias}}
{{c.createdMoment}}
{{c.body}}
{{cc.alias}}
{{cc.createdMoment}}
+{{cc.replyToName}} {{cc.body}}
No comments yet.
Logged in as {{user.alias}}. Log out
Login failed

Register user/reset password

Name needs to be fewer than 32 characters long
Comment needs to be fewer than 600 characters long
{{comment.captcha.word.answer}}

news.err.ee

Opinion
Estonia’s way into the future isn’t a race

There is a lack of connection between the Estonian state, and the people who live here. While it expects a lot of the state, Estonian society doesn’t seem ready to contribute, writes Viktor Trasberg.

Lotman: Security academy would be crucial Estonian identity point in Narva

In an opinion piece published by Eesti Päevaleht, Tallinn University professor Mihhail Lotman found it important to overcome the mental barrier separating Ida-Viru County from the rest of Estonia.