Some Residents of Northeastern City View Obama Visit With Misgivings ({{commentsTotal}})

Narva Castle, at Estonia's border with Russia Source: Photo: Postimees/Scanpix
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Five of five residents surveyed by ERR in the ethnically majority-Russian city of Narva say they view Barack Obama's visit as boding ill.

The people surveyed by ERR radio said they viewed Obama as having picked a fight with Russia and that relations could go further downhill.

"To be honest it doesn't bring me any cheer. America brings with it war and death. I'm afraid," said one Russian-speaking woman.

"It's not good news," said another person surveyed. "I support Russia, Obama is doing only ill, agitating against Russia."

When people were asked why they thought the US president came to visit Estonia: "To ally European countries against Russia. This is bad. One should live in friendship with neighbors."

A fourth person said he had heard of five military bases in the Baltics and that this was not good news.

"This is a political visit as we live near Russia, the visit is intended to strengthen protection," said one Narva resident.

Finally, the residents were asked what their message to Barack Obama was. "Get your own affairs in order in the US and then come help us but not interfere here."

"Tanks are not needed in Estonia," said another.



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