Ojuland Named Chairman of Party of People's Unity ({{commentsTotal}})

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Former Reform Party heavyweight Kristiina Ojuland has been elected in as the Party of People's Unity's first chairman, the party she founded after being ejected from the party in 2013 for allegedly rigging internal elections.

The party also approved its statutes, with Ojuland saying passing the 5 percent threshold is her main task.

Ojuland, who was the only candidate for chairman, said her task now is to strengthen the party in rural areas, find suitable candidates for the March national elections, and draw up an election program.

“Our goal is to unite people living in Estonia, independent of their ethnicity, sex, age, mental or physical capabilities. Very important reforms are on the horizon for Estonia. The Estonian state apparatus need reform and Estonia needs great economic reforms and changes to the tax system to ensure the survival of the Estonian nations for the next decades,” Ojuland said.

The party said they would back a smaller Parliament of 71 instead of 101 MPs, direct presidential elections, and abolishing county governments to save on administrative costs.

The latest Emor polls put the popularity of the new party below 1 percent. The Free Party, the other political entity created this year, had a 2 percent rating in October.



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