Tallinn Music Week Chosen Among The Top 10 Music Festivals ({{commentsTotal}})

Culture
Culture

British quality daily The Guardian has picked the Top 10 music festivals for winter breaks and Tallinn Music Week is among them.

„Tallinn is known for its art-nouveau architecture, free public transport – and its ability to attract stag and hen parties. It’s also becoming increasingly relevant for the music it serves up, especially at this developing annual event. Tallinn Music Week is always opened by Estonia’s rock-digging president Toomas Hendrik Ilves, who has been known to quote PJ Harvey and Jello Biafra in his annual festival speech. The bands are hardly big name acts, but if you’re in the mood to discover some new Baltic beats, this is the place to do it,“ the paper said.

The Wire Magazine has previously suggested that the “Tallinn Music Week has proven that a country as small as Estonia punches well above its weight in terms of musical talent. The degree of technical ability and polish shown, across many different genres, both live and on record, was very impressive. What’s more, Tallinn’s musical community is warm, well informed and enthusiastic.”

Tallinn Music Week is a three-day music industry conference and one of the biggest indoor festivals in the Baltic region that started out in 2009. The mission of the festival is to raise the reputation of Estonian music, to enhance the international development of local music industry and to promote Tallinn and Estonia as an exciting cultural tourism destination.



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