'10 million e-Estonians' launched, with more modest initial targets ({{commentsTotal}})

E-votes are cast using a national ID card Source: Photo: Postimees/Scanpix
Technology
Technology

The Ministry of Economic Affairs and Communications has launched stage two of the e-residency project, the ambitiously titled "10 million e-Estonians" program. While recent days have brought some moderation, as server systems would not be able to handle such interest yet, and in any case the actual targets are to attract at least 17,000 e-residents, and through them 5,000 businesses, in the next three years.

The program will be implemented by a special team, who will be part of Enterprise Estonia's E-Estonia Showroom. The responsibility for the implementation lies with Taavi Kotka, under secretary for IT at the Ministry of Economic Affairs and Communications, who will lead the program council made up of state and private sector representatives.

The "10 million e-Estonians" program has six areas: e-residency registration, development of e-services, service quality and support, risk management and security, development of the legal system, and marketing and communication.

The ministry also plans to take immediate steps to simplify the e-residency application process, uudised.err.ee reported.



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