Study: Estonian children not physically active enough to stay healthy ({{commentsTotal}})

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Estonian children, and European youth in general, are not sufficiently physically active to stay healthy and avoid obesity, a study involving Estonian researchers found.

A study published in the International Journal of Obesity involved boys and girls between the ages of two and 10 from eight European countries (Sweden, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Cyprus, Spain, Belgium and Estonia).

Whereas it has been estimated that children in that age need to be physically active for at least 60 minutes each day to remain healthy, it turned out that in Estonia, only 13 percent of the girls and 27 percent of the boys met this recommendation. The situation was not much different in other seven countries.

It is also noteworthy that as a general rule, boys are much more active than girls.

Girls are least active in Cyprus (2 percent are physically active for 60 minutes or more per day) and most active in Sweden (14.7 percent); boys in Italy (9.5 percent) and Belgium (34.1 percent) respectively.

The data was gathered by using activity monitors that recorded values for physical activity and sedentary time for over 7,000 children.

The graph shows how long children are physically active each day in different countries.



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