'Tangerines' actor Ulfsak: Oscar nomination alone is a victory ({{commentsTotal}})

Culture
Culture

Lembit Ulfsak, the star of the Oscar-nominated Estonian-Georgian movie "Tangerines", said that although the film's potential was clear to him from the moment he first laid eyes on the script, none of the crew members had even dreamt that it would be the first ever Estonian movie to be nominated for both a Golden Globe and an Oscar.

"What is it about the film's plot that resonates with so many viewers?", ERR's editor asked Ulfsak in a phone interview shortly after this year's nominees were announced in Los Angeles on Thursday morning.

"A very well-known American critic said that it's simple and moving, that's it," Ulfsak replied.

Asked about the competition and their chances of winning, Ulfsak said that there was a chance at the Golden Globes and there is a one now, but the nomination itself is already a victory and he dreads to dream of anything more. He added that out of the other four nominees, he has only seen "Ida", which is "a very cultural and properly made movie", but not as moving and natural as the "Tangerines".

"You just got back from the Golden Globes and have to return to that continent soon. What does it feel like to take part of these glamorous film galas? There are none like it in Estonia," the journalist asked.

"They are a strange phenomena, but I guess it comes with the success, or super success. I have no wish to go there but if the party and the government say I must go, I must go," Ulfsak joked.

Editor: M. Oll



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