Russian authorities cracking down on personal food imports from Estonia ({{commentsTotal}})

Narva (left) and Ivangorod Source: Photo: Postimees/Scanpix
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Russian authorities confiscate tens or hundreds of kilograms of food each day at the Ivangorod border checkpoint, just across the river from Narva, a Russian site reported.

Rosselkhoznadzor, the federal veterinary and phytosanitary surveillance board, confiscated 31 kilograms of dairy products, 27 kg of cheese and 25 kg of sausages from one car alone at the beginning of the week, 47news.ru reported.

The next day authorities found 174 kilograms of meat and dairy products from one vehicle and 36 kg of meat products from a second car.

All food was sent back to Estonia.

Narva serves as a economic out post for the West. Last summer Russian flocked to Narva, with even bus tours from St. Petersburg organized, to shop for food in Narva, after Russia banned all food imports from Western nations.

A few months later Narva residents flocked to Russia to buy consumer goods as the ruble plummeted.

Editor: J.M. Laats



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