'Tangerines' wins Satellite Award ahead of main Oscar rivals ({{commentsTotal}})

Culture
Culture

The Estonian-Georgian film "Tangerines", which in a week's time is up for an Oscar, has beaten its biggest rivals "Ida" and "Leviathan" for the International Press Academy's annual Satellite Award for the best international motion picture.

The International Press Academy (IPA) is a global association of professional entertainment journalists representing a multitude of renowned print, broadcast and digital media outlets. Each year it honors artistic excellence in the areas of motion pictures, television, radio, and new media.

The "Tangerines" was up against nine other contenders, in addition to all four Oscar nominees, also "Little England" (Greece), "Gett: The Trial of Viviane Amsalem" (Israel), "Force Majeure" (Sweden), "Mommy" (Canada), and "Two Days, One Night" (Belgium).

Last year, the Satellite Award for the best international film went to Belgium's "The Broken Circle Breakdown," which eventually lost out to Italy's "The Great Beauty" at the Oscars.

The award for the best motion picture went to "Birdman," awards for best actress and actor to Julianne Moore and Michael Keaton respectively. See the full list of this year's nominees and winners here.

Editor: M. Oll



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