Twilio expands to Estonia, creates 50 jobs ({{commentsTotal}})

Business
Business

Twilio, the Silicon Valley-based software and cloud-based communications platform, announced the opening of its newest office in Tallinn, Estonia. The new office will focus on research and development, technical operations and support of Twilio’s growing global customer base.

Twilio's decision to choose Estonia was helped along by an Estonian Ott Kaukver, Skype’s former head of engineering, who joined as vice president of engineering at Twilio two years ago.

“As Twilio’s international customer base continues to grow, we’re excited to tap the strong developer network in Estonia to help meet the requirements of our global customers," Kaukver, who oversees Twilio’s worldwide R&D team, said. “We’re actively recruiting for multiple product engineering teams who will be responsible for new products being added to Twilio’s global communications platform."

"R&D is in our DNA," Jeff Lawson, CEO and co-founder of Twilio, added. "When we founded Twilio, we knew there was no instruction manual, and we needed to create the product for a market that we knew existed, but so far hadn't been addressed. Estonia, the first of our international R&D locations, will let us tap into a more diverse talent pool and continue our tradition of empowering our customers with access to the latest, most forward-thinking communications technology available. We can't wait to see what they'll build next."

Founded in 2008, Twilio is a cloud communications company that allows software developers to programmatically make and receive phone calls and send and receive text messages using its web service APIs. The company is privately-held and has over 300 employees with offices in San Francisco, New York City, London, and now Tallinn. Twilio's platform has more than 400,000 registered developers and is used in more than one million unique software applications. Its clients include Uber, AirBnB, Coca Cola, Walmart, Paypal.

Editor: S. Tambur



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