Complete ban on alcohol ads is impossible, says PM Rõivas ({{commentsTotal}})

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Although a recent study showed 80 percent of Estonians want to see alcohol ads banned completely, in a similar manner to the tobacco ad ban, Prime Minister Taavi Rõivas said such a move would be highly complicated as part of the internet advertizing comes from abroad.

“A total alcohol ad ban has not yet been implemented by any European Union state. Banning ads in all forms of media is technically not possible. Take Internet, for example, where according to estimates by Estonian websites, half of ads are sold by Google and other similar multinational companies, who Estonian legislation might not reach,” Rõivas said.

Riina Raudne, the head of Terve Eesti AS, a health foundation which commissioned the study, said she does not agree with Rõivas. She said online tobacco ads have been successfully banned.

Rõivas said additional limits are likely to arrive this year, depending on the outcome of the coalition talks. He said political parties have a broad-based consensus on alcohol policy.

The policy of limiting the availablity of strong alcohol, so as to encourage people to prefer beer and cider instead, is no longer sensible, Raudne said, adding that a can of cider has the same amount of ethanol as one-and-a-half shots of vodka.

Editor: J.M. Laats



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