15-17th century masterpieces displayed in Tallinn Town Hall ({{commentsTotal}})

Culture
Culture

The "Art Rules" exhibition in Tallinn Town Hall presents original artworks from the great European masters of the 15-17th centuries. Works come from private collections all over the world.

Featured in the exhibition are 90 original masterpieces by some of the most famous painters of the era, including Pieter and Jan Brueghel, Lucas Cranach, Albrecht Dürer, David Teniers, Jakob van Hulsdonck, Jacob Savery, Jan Massys and many others.

This is the first time artworks of this level are displayed in Estonia in such quantity.

The title of the exhibition – "Art Rules" – refers to the points of contact between power and creation. Tallinn Town Hall as the symbol of medieval town authorities and the medieval spirit, is a meaningful location in which to display the works of old masters, the organizers explain.

The building, completed in its present day form in 1404, is the only surviving Gothic town hall in Northern Europe.

The exhibition is open daily from 9:30 to 17:30 until October 5. The entrance fee is 14 euros, concession price 6 euros.

The exhibition has been organized by Art-Life Project, in cooperation with the Town Hall.

View the exhibition catalogue here.

Editor: M. Oll



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