Estonia to combat food waste ({{commentsTotal}})

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Representatives from four government ministries convened today to discuss food wastage in Estonia, which is calculated at 63 million euros annually.

According to a study by the Ministry of the Environment, Estonians throw out 63 million euros worth of food each year, and a third of that would still have been usable.

Officials from the social, environment, economy and agriculture ministries agreed that the state needs an action plan to combat the problem.

Which ministry will be tasked with which aspect of the problem, should be mapped out by fall.

Taavi Kand, head of the Trade and Agro-Food Department at the Agriculture Ministry, said there is much the state can do to cut food waste, such as informing consumers and even tax measures. He said his ministry can take on the food industry, helping them decrease waste at different production stages.

The average Estonian household currently throws away 20 kilograms and 120 euros worth of food each year, amounting to an annual total of 63 million euros. Food waste is primarily attributable to households (42 percent), followed by the food processing industry (39 percent), catering services (14 percent) and retail services (5 percent).

The European Union wastes around 50 percent of its food as a whole.

Editor: J.M. Laats, A. Kaer



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