Eesti Post: post offices will remain in rural areas, but form could change ({{commentsTotal}})

The Post24 machines will not be influenced by the price hike. Source: (Eesti Post)
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Eesti Post, the state-owned postal carrier also known as Omniva, said the company has no plans to close all post offices in rural areas, despite making three million euros loss each year from the operation.

Omniva CEO Aavo Kärmas said that his company is not allowed to close post offices due to legal restrictions stated in Postal Act, but the company does plan to carry on merging post offices with stores or libraries, if suitable partners are found.

He said postmen also offer all the services of a post office if a person lives further than 5 kilometers from the nearest post office.

The company has 201 post offices around Estonia, as well as offering postal services in 124 shops or libraries. Post offices in small settlements remain idle for most of the month, but are vital for pensioners, who come to collect money at the beginning of the month.

In the Maaleht piece, Kärmas said that Ominva could close the majority of its post offices in the next five years. Omniva makes an annual loss of around three million euros from post offices, although the company as a whole, is in the black.

Editor: J.M. Laats



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