Estonian Bike-ID registry goes global ({{commentsTotal}})

Technology
Technology

Every year over 3,500,000 bikes are stolen in Europe. That is 6 bikes every minute. Estonian company Bike-ID is now going global with its bicycle registry, aiming to help bike owners all over the world keep their wheels safe.

Most of the 3,5 million bikes stolen in Europe every year are sold outside the country of origin, which makes them hard to trace and retrieve.

"To fight bike theft, the Bike-ID bike registry that launched this spring, has decided to expand first to Europe and then enter the US and Asian markets," Bike-ID's CEO Meeri Klausen said.

In addition to running a registry, the start-up offers security stickers and micro-tags that bear the registration number of the bike, can be applied all over the bike, and help to verify the owner even when the frame number has been removed.

Bike-ID was established in April 2015 and currently has about 5,500 entries.

Editor: M. Oll



{{c.alias}}
{{c.createdMoment}}
{{c.body}}
{{cc.alias}}
{{cc.createdMoment}}
+{{cc.replyToName}} {{cc.body}}
No comments yet.
Logged in as {{user.alias}}. Log out
Login failed

Register user/reset password

Name needs to be fewer than 32 characters long
Comment needs to be fewer than 600 characters long
{{comment.captcha.word.answer}}

news.err.ee

Opinion
Independence Day: Estonia’s way into the future isn’t a race

There is a lack of connection between the Estonian state, and the people who live here. While it expects a lot of the state, Estonian society doesn’t seem ready to contribute, writes Viktor Trasberg.

Lotman: Security academy would be crucial Estonian identity point in Narva

In an opinion piece published by Eesti Päevaleht, Tallinn University professor Mihhail Lotman found it important to overcome the mental barrier separating Ida-Viru County from the rest of Estonia.