Elering: Russia cannot fine us for disconnecting from its power grid ({{commentsTotal}})

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According to media reports, Russia may want to present the Baltic nations with a giant bill of 2.5 billion euros, in case the three decide to remove themselves from the Russian electricity grid.

Currently, the Estonian, Latvian and Lithuanian electricity systems are part of a larger synchronized system called BRELL, which also unites Belarus. Russia would have to construct new transmission lines if the Baltic states leave, and that could cost as much as 2.5 billion euros.

Elering, which manages power lines in Estonia, said the reports are confusing, as current contracts state that only a notice to Russia is necessary.

“These contracts commit to informing and coordinating, certainly not to any compensation or financial liabilities,” Elering's CEO Taavi Veskimägi said.

He added that they hope to remove Estonia from the Russian power network by 2030.

Russian President Vladimir Putin recently said such a move would cost billions of euros. Brussels has considered reimbursing Moscow, although its figure is far lower, closer to one billion euros, LSM reported.

Editor: J.M. Laats



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