Allied troops in Estonia face abuse outside barracks, says air force chief ({{commentsTotal}})

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Colonel Jaak Tarien, the head of the Estonian Air Force took to social media on Wednesday to vent his disappointment about how US soldiers whose skin color is slightly different from the native population's are treated outside the barracks in Tallinn.

Tarien watched a training exercise on Wednesday involving US A-10 jets and troops from Estonia, the United States and Germany, among other nations.

He asked US troops how they are faring in Estonia, receiving an answer that the land is beautiful, Estonians are proud of their nation, houses are fixed up and streets clean. The only complaint is that some are being treated badly when venturing outside of the barracks for some rest.

“I asked for more details and I received information that those allies, who have slightly different skin complexions to the locals, often have to endure verbal and sometimes also physical attacks in Tallinn,” Tarien said.

Tarian said he told the troops he was ashamed for the behavior of Estonians.

On the social media post, which has received massive support, he asked if those who are racists and who consider themselves to be true patriots are as willing to give their lives to protect Estonia, as the allied troops stationed in Estonia are.

The post can be found here (in Estonian).

Editor: J.M. Laats



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