Rõivas: Estonia is governed by the rule of law ({{commentsTotal}})

Prime Minister Taavi Rõivas Source: (Martin Dremljuga/ERR)

Minister of Social Protection Margus Tsahkna (IRL) said in a statement on Facebook on Thursday that the two refugees who had turned to court over their residence permits were “biting the hand that feeds them”. The prime minister disagreed.

Prime Minister Taavi Rõivas said on ERR’s Vikerraadio on Friday that he didn’t see things that way. “If Estonia is a state governed by the rule of law, then everyone in Estonia has to be able to stand up for their rights,” Rõivas said.

Two refugees took the authorities to court because they had only been granted subsidiary protection status, instead of refugee status. Minister of Social Protection Margus Tsahkna, who is also the chairman of the coalition’s languishing conservative junior partner, insinuated on social media on Thursday that this showed a lack of gratitude and said that there was “no point biting the hand that feeds you”.

Rõivas said that the different statuses notwithstanding, the most important thing was that everyone could insist on their rights. “If one or two people take the matter to court, it will get resolved and a precedent will be created for the future. I certainly don’t see a tragedy happening here if any person in Estonia can turn to the courts to defend their rights,” Rõivas said.

Editor: Editor: Dario Cavegn



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