‘Saber Strike’ staff exercise to begin in Tapa on Tuesday ({{commentsTotal}})

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The main part of the 2016 U.S. European forces’ “Saber Strike” exercises will take place in Estonia. While the troops currently moving towards the Baltic States from Germany will train tactical movements on the way as well, a staff exercise will begin in Tapa already on Tuesday.

“Saber Strike” has the aim to practice the movement of troops and equipment from allied NATO bases farther west to the Baltic region. U.S. forces started their 2,400-km journey in Germany on Friday. They will join units already stationed in Lithuania, Latvia, and Estonia.

About 400 technical units, armored vehicles and support vehicles among them, are moving towards the Baltic States. They will pass six European countries in total.

On the way, the units will perform tactical exercises. Upon making it to Estonia, the troops will stop in Valga, Tartu, Sillamäe, and Pärnu.

Field exercises will start on Jun. 13 and practice the cooperation between ground troops and air forces, as well as the efforts involved in hosting allied troops.

This year’s “Saber Strike” is the sixth such exercise, and the biggest so far. More than 10,000 troops from 13 allied and partner countries will participate. The staff exercise set to begin in Tapa tomorrow Tuesday will be run by the staff of a Danish unit.

Editor: Editor: Dario Cavegn



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