Estonian president: Cooperation with Brits must continue ({{commentsTotal}})

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Estonian President Toomas Hendrik Ilves, who on Sunday hosted Poland's President Andrzej Duda and his wife, Agata Kornhauser-Duda, at his Arma farm in southern Estonia, stressed that even though the United Kingdom has decided to leave the European Union the good cooperation with the Brits must not be broken off.

The main topics at the dinner of the heads of state were the British referendum on EU membership and the future of the bloc and the forthcoming NATO summit in the Polish capital Warsaw at which allies will agree solutions to strengthen the eastern flank of the alliance. "We must give the Brits a reasonable period of time to weigh the implications of their decision, but there isn't a limitless amount of time available," Ilves underlined. "At the same time the Brits will even after Brexit stay in Europe, remain our important allies, and this relationship must be guarded."

Ilves and Duda acknowledged that the major decisions on increasing allied presence on the eastern flank of NATO have been talked through in principle but the agreements will of course be finalized at the Warsaw summit.

"NATO needn't justify itself or apologize to anyone – what we're doing is related to the credibility of the alliance and all allies' security," said Ilves in whose words NATO's Warsaw summit is a part of shaping the present-day transatlantic security architecture. "Successful organization of the summit will confirm Poland's role as a key security policy player in central and eastern Europe."



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