Minister: Farmers don’t receive fair share of retail price ({{commentsTotal}})

Business
Business

According to Minister of Rural Affairs Urmas Kruuse (Reform), the situation on the Estonian retail market is such that farmers are not getting a large enough share of the final price of products. The Ministry of Rural Affairs has made a proposal to the government to discuss and study the spread of unfair trade practices in Estonia.

"Today we are in a situation where farmers do not get enough of the final price," Kruuse told BNS. He added that in many cases the problem might be that farmers don't have enough leverage to stand up for what they are entitled to. "If farmers do not get a fair price, there is no support that would help them," the minister said.

Kruuse stressed that the ministry did not wish to intervene in the free market, but wanted to raise the question whether contracts with farmers were always fair. "Are the agreements really concluded between two equal parties, or are they made from a position of power, especially with regard to contract penalties and transport conditions?”, Kruuse asked.

To describe, map and study the situation, the ministry has drawn up a memorandum to discuss the issues in the government, the minister said.

Editor: Editor: Dario Cavegn



{{c.alias}}
{{c.createdMoment}}
{{c.body}}
{{cc.alias}}
{{cc.createdMoment}}
+{{cc.replyToName}} {{cc.body}}
No comments yet.
Logged in as {{user.alias}}. Log out
Login failed

Register user/reset password

Name needs to be fewer than 32 characters long
Comment needs to be fewer than 600 characters long
{{comment.captcha.word.answer}}

news.err.ee

Opinion
Independence Day: Estonia’s way into the future isn’t a race

There is a lack of connection between the Estonian state, and the people who live here. While it expects a lot of the state, Estonian society doesn’t seem ready to contribute, writes Viktor Trasberg.

Lotman: Security academy would be crucial Estonian identity point in Narva

In an opinion piece published by Eesti Päevaleht, Tallinn University professor Mihhail Lotman found it important to overcome the mental barrier separating Ida-Viru County from the rest of Estonia.