35,000 people in Estonia receive EU food aid ({{commentsTotal}})

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EU food aid for underprivileged persons is distributed to approximately 35,000 people in Estonia annually, the Ministry of Social Affairs said.

Together with self-financing, Estonia will have approximately 8.9 million euros at its disposal for the provision of food aid through 2020. The EU money comes from the Fund for European Aid to the Most Deprived (FEAD), which supports member states' social emergency relief schemes.

Until 2020, food aid will be distributed twice per year, with the estimated number of recipients numbering 35,000 annually, Merle Ploompuu, chief specialist at the care department of the Ministry of Social Affairs, told BNS, adding that the two periods per year during which food aid will be distributed the following year are determined at the end of each year.

"The criteria for receiving food aid are the same for everyone across Estonia," she explained. "Eligible to receive this aid are applicants for income support who meet the criteria set for recipients or whose income after the deduction of housing costs does not exceed the current subsistence minimum by more than 15 percent. Other recipients include homeless people admitted to homeless shelters and recipients of needs-based family support."

The food aid package weighs about 15 kilograms and contains buckwheat, wheat flour, rice, raisins, cooking oil, sugar, canned beef and canned chicken, canned sprats, ready-to-serve solyanka soup in glass jars, chocolate, muesli and coffee.

Editor: Editor: Aili Vahtla



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