Russia prepared to partially lift ban on Estonian, Latvian canned fish products ({{commentsTotal}})

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Russian Veterinary and Phytosanitary Surveillance Service (Rosselkhoznadzor), which inspected fish-processing plants in Estonia and Latvia this summer, has decided to partially lift its ban on the two countries' canned fish products and allow these products back onto the Russian market.

Russia's decision to ban Estonian and Latvian canned fish products followed the EU's spring 2015 decision to introduce a trade sanctions following Russia's annexation of Crimea. Russia justified its ban by claiming that Estonian and Latvian canned fish products did not meet food safety requirements.

Rosselkhoznadzor announced on Friday that it is prepared to resume the import of Estonian and Latvian canned fish products from a few companies. A full restoration of imports would certainly not be happening, however, confirmed Russian veterinary service director Sergey Dankvert.

Editor: Editor: Aili Vahtla



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