Estonian government approves ban on display of tobacco products in stores ({{commentsTotal}})

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The Estonian government approved a bill by Minister of Health and Labour Jevgeni Ossinovski on Thursday which would substantially increase restrictions concerning the sale of tobacco products, including by restricting the display of tobacco products and their brands at points of sale.

The changes to the Tobacco Act would expand the sphere of regulation of the law to prevent and reduce the spread of addiction and health damage as a result of tobacco and tobacco products, the motion by the Ministry of Social Affairs states.

Among the biggest changes would be a ban on the display of tobacco products and their brands at points of sale. The exceptions are specialized retail stores, ships sailing on international routes as well as stores located in close proximity to the airport and port in the capital of Tallinn.

The bill also seeks to reduce the accessibility and consumption of e-cigarettes. For instance, in the future, the use of e-cigarettes would be banned, in addition to at children's institutions, in all places where smoking is banned as well, including in restaurants and stores. In addition, it would not be possible to buy tobacco products or e-cigarettes online or from a catalog.

Editor: Editor: Aili Vahtla



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