Culture.ee's Midsummer recommendations ({{commentsTotal}})

A Midsummer celebration in the Estonian countryside. Photo is illustrative.
A Midsummer celebration in the Estonian countryside. Photo is illustrative. Source: (ERR)

A selection of Midsummer events taking place in Estonia this weekend as curated by culture.ee: "This time it is especially nice, because Midsummer's Night is on Friday, so one can celebrate the sun all weekend!"

Ongoing - Friday, June 23

20th Suure-Jaani Music Festival

Suure-Jaani

A festival dedicated to the Kapp family of composers, classical and Estonian music as well as musicians offers something for every taste. In addition to concerts, the festival features a competition for young singers and songwriters, photo and art exhibitions as well as lunchtime meetings with artists. The crowning jewel of the festival is the traditional 3 a.m. sunrise concert to take place on Hüpassaare bog island in Soomaa National Park.

Friday, June 23

Avinurme Barrel Fair

Various locations, Avinurme

This is a real piece of folk culture, featuring crafts, food and an entertainment program for all ages on the barrel stage, including guest and local performers alike. As is fitting during the Year of Children’s and Youth Culture, both the young and those young at heart will take the stage.
The main performer of the day is the village band of Nedsaja.

Visitors can check out new and interesting things at the Wooden Handicrafts Centre and the Lifestyle Centre, take a ride on the famous Avinurme train or enjoy treats by summer cafés. The locally famous Ilves Sisters will give the first concert of their summer tour at Avinurme Church and Avinurme Summer Theatre will stage a performance of "When are You Coming Back?

Friday, June 23 - Saturday, June 24

Victory Day and Midsummer’s Eve at Raadi Manor Park

Estonian National Museum, Tartu

The Estonian National Museum invites you to celebrate Victory Day and Midsummer’s Eve at Raadi Manor Park, which will include a bonfire, music and dances. Visitors can also expect a carousel, trampoline, exhibitions, outdoor chess, mall cars, orientation and of course a bonfire, with performances by Lõõtsavägilased, Folksell and Konterbant.

Friday, June 23

Midsummer at the Estonian Open Air Museum

Estonian Open Air Museum, Tallinn

This large event will feature bonfires, music played by well-known folk musicians, colorful striped skirts twirling in dance, village swings squeaking and children shrieking as they play traditional games. Tuulelõõtsutajad and Leigarid will be dancing, Svjata Vatra will heat things up and a romantic mood will be set by Trio Romansid.

Vihula Manor Midsummer's Eve bonfire

Vihula Manor

Just like in the olden days, there will be singing and dancing, playing and talking at Vihula Manor. Food and drink are offered at the Midsummer Eve grounds, Kaval-Ants’ tavern, and Vesiveski. The ensemble Kihnu Poisid will sing and play for dancing for long after midnight. A Midsummer Eve magic workshop is held to predict the future for whoever is interested. After midnight, the party continues to the rhythms of disco music until there is someone left to dance.

Saturday, June 24 - Sunday, June 25

Narva Medieval Festival

Narva Castle

And now for something completely different, but also very much fun! Narva Museum is inviting all history-lovers to Narva Castle on June 24-25, where the medieval era will be resurrected at Narva Medieval Festival in cooperation with the Teutonic Order from St. Petersburg. In the courtyard of Narva Castle, scenes from the year 1346, when the sales agreement of the castle was signed by the King of Denmark and the German Order, will be reenacted. Festivalgoers can also watch and cheer on knights’ tournaments as well as sword and archery competitions. Medieval musicians and traveling clowns will perform and there will be theater and versatile entertainment characteristic of the era.

Voronja Gallery's fourth summer season: Peter Belyi's "Open Borders"

Voronja Gallery, Varnja, Tartu County

The exhibition is compiled by St. Petersburg-based artist and curator Peter Belyi, who has involved artists in the exhibition who work on creating connections between the organic and inorganic worlds and use nature or natural processes for creating art. This is definitely not the only reason we want you to visit the area, however! It is really something special. Even if you find Estonian nature and culture special in general, this place, this whole area actually, is even more memorable!

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This post originally appeared on the Culture critics' blog at culture.ee.

Editor: Aili Vahtla