Samost: Adage that businessmen can't cope in politics proven once again ({{commentsTotal}})

Businessman Urmas Sõõrumaa as he and Jüri Mõis, the leaders of Active Tallinn, met with representatives of Edgar Savisaar's election coalition on Friday. Aug. 25, 2017..
Businessman Urmas Sõõrumaa as he and Jüri Mõis, the leaders of Active Tallinn, met with representatives of Edgar Savisaar's election coalition on Friday. Aug. 25, 2017.. Source: (Siim Lõvi/ERR)

Last week, Active Tallinn ("Tegus Tallinn"), the election coalition led by businessmen Urmas Sõõrumaa and Jüri Mõis, decided to join forces with that of former Center Party chairman and suspended Tallinn mayor Edgar Savisaar. According to journalist Anvar Samost, this just confirmed the old adage that businessmen can't cope in the world of politics.

Samost noted that the old adage that businessmen can't cope in politics had been proven once again.

"Of course the moment of truth will be in the elections, but all they managed to do with their election coalition was hire a former Southern Estonian meat industry leader as their campaign manager, fire them and add some dubious names to their roster such as Leonid Tsingisser or Rodion Denissov," the journalist summarized.

Show cohost Ainar Ruussaar, on the other hand, did not agree that Mõis and Sõõrumaa are examples of businessmen unable to cut it in the world of politics. He pointed out that Mõis, for one thing, was very experienced in politics, having served as both mayor of Tallinn as well as Minister of the Interior, and had even been chosen Press Friend of the Year in 1999 for his exceptionally bold statements. Sõõrumaa, meanwhile, had at one time served as Savisaar's adviser and, in the 1990s, his bodyguard, which meant that they were old friends.

"Your claim is apparently based on the fact that Savisaar delivered two press conferences this past week and made statements in which he has been very self-confident, very satisfied and even cheerful somehow," Ruusaar noted.

Samost nonetheless has yet to understand how these two businessmen will run based on the platform published by Savisaar's election coalition on Friday, even if just one quarter of it makes the cut in the end. He said he would love to see what Mõis will have to say about such election platform issues as home loans on favorable terms from Tallinn Bank, increasing the pension supplement to €150, the imposing of social tariffs on household electric, heating and water customers as well as free trash collection.

At the same time, Samost was curious to see how Mõis and Sõõrumaa would behave on the city council. "This has the potential to end up one of the great political comedies of Estonian political history," he commented.

Ruussaar added that many entrepreneurs were likewise very critical of Mõis and Sõõrumaa's recent move.

Editor: Aili Vahtla



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