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December in grocery stores: All dairy products cheaper on year

Milk and dairy products on a supermarket shelf. Photo is illustrative.
Milk and dairy products on a supermarket shelf. Photo is illustrative. Source: Priit Mürk/ERR

Comparing food prices in December of 2022 and last year, all dairy products became cheaper, while most meat products, baked goods and eggs continued to get more expensive.

Data from the Estonian Institute of Economic Research suggests that while most foods continued to get more expensive last year, all dairy products had become cheaper in December compared to the same period the year before last.

The price of milk in a plastic bag fell from €1.02 in December 2022 to €0.94 a year later for a 16 percent decrease.

Sour cream became 7 percent cheaper and kefir in a plastic bag 8 percent. The price of butter fell by 2 percent, and the same goes for the price of cream. Cottage cheese and Estonian cheese became cheaper by under 1 percent.

Dairy prices also fell in December 2023 compared to the previous month. The price of milk in a plastic bag fell 11 percent during that period.

Local cheese prices fell by 5 percent and that of sour cream by 3 percent from November to December last year.

But the price of eggs moved in the opposite direction. If the average box of M-size eggs of Estonian origin went for €2.31 in the final month of 2022, this had grown to €2.62 by the end of last year (up 13 percent). The price of larger L-size eggs also grew. Imported eggs also become more expensive, while the hike was slower there at 3 percent.

Coming to cereals and baked goods, the price of a kilogram of wheat flour fell by 4 percent over the reference period, from €1.33 to €1.28.

But black bread became 14 percent and white bread 8 percent more expensive on year. The price of a kilo of black bread jumped from €2.68 in 2022 to €2.90 last year. White bread went from €2.58 to €2.93.

The price of oat flakes also grew both between 2022 and 2023 and from November to December of last year. The former hike was from €2.25 to €2.39 per kilo.

A kilo of sugar could be had for €1.42 in December of last year, up 6 percent from €1.33 in 2022.

Most meat products became more expensive in December on year, with the exception of smoked pork chops.

Imported broiler became a whopping 24 percent more expensive between Decembers 2022 and 2023, with the price growing 12 percent from November to December last year alone. The price of a kilo went from €3.14 in late 2022 to €3.90 around last Christmas.

The price of local broiler grew from €3.89 to €4.05 year-over-year.

Pork ribs became 12 percent more expensive on year, while local minced meat gained 10 percent in terms of price. A kilo of the latter went for €7.31 in 2022 and €8.06 in 2023. The price of bologna grew by 10 percent, while a kilogram of wiener gained 7 percent.

The price of fish varied greatly from shops to markets as well as in annual terms. For example, chilled trout became 7 percent cheaper in stores, the price dropping from €11.46 to €10.68, while trout fillet became 8 percent more expensive. Chilled salmon became 16 percent more expensive while salmon fillet lost 17 percent of its price.

The price of chilled perch grew the most from €5.49 per kilo in 2022 to €10.87 last December – an increase of 98 percent.

The price of Baltic herring sold at markets grew from €4.55 to €5.39.

Imported tomatoes became 48 percent more expensive on year, while local cucumbers gained 45 percent. This means that a kilogram of tomatoes set customers back €2.40 in 2022 and €3.55 last year. Estonian cucumbers went for €3.84 versus €5.57.

Onions became 35 percent more expensive between Decembers 2022 and 2023, while imported apples gained 22 percent.

On the flip side, cabbage lost a fifth of its price in the same period, while carrots became 11 percent cheaper. The price of potatoes also fell a little.

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Editor: Karin Koppel, Marcus Turovski

Source: Estonian Institute of Economic Research

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